Online Interdisciplinary Seminars on SM-SBR

Online Interdisciplinary Seminars on Statistical Methodology for Social and Behavioral Research

The online interdisciplinary seminars on statistical methodology for social and behavioral research is supported by the department of statistics and the department of education psychology in the University of Connecticut (UCONN), the Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) and the New England Statistical Society (NESS). The seminar is held online via WebEx and anyone in the world can join and it is scheduled monthly on Friday noon. The aims of the seminar are to promote the connection between the statistics and social/behavioral science communities and to encourage more graduate students to participate in the interdisciplinary research.

The past and current upcoming seminars are

Date
Speaker
Affiliation
Title
11/20/2020 11:30-1:00pm  EST Bengt Muthen University of California Recent Advances in Latent Variable Modeling
12/18/2020 12:00-1:15pm  EST Paul De Boeck The Ohio State University Response Accuracy and Response Time in Cognitive Tests
1/29/2021 12:00-1:15pm  EST P. Richard Hahn Arizona State University
2/26/2021 12:00-1:15pm  EST Edward Ip Wake Forest University
3/26/2021 12:00-1:15pm  EST David Dunson Duke University
4/9/2021 12:00-1:15pm  EST Susan Paddock NORC at the University of Chicago
4/23/2021 2:00-3:15pm  EST Jean-Paul Fox University of Twente
9/10/2021 12:00-1:00pm  EST Susan Murphy Harvard University

For announcements and WebEx live streaming links, please contact Tracy Burke (tracy.burke@uconn.edu).

For questions related to the seminars, please feel free to contact organizers
(Prof. Xiaojing Wang (xiaojing.wang@uconn.edu) and Prof. Betsy McCoach (betsy.mccoach@uconn.edu) ).


Bengt Muthen, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles

Friday, November 20, 2020 11:30am -1:00pm

Recent Advances in Latent Variable Modeling


This talk gives an overview of some recent and ongoing latent variable research. Borrowing ideas from multilevel factor analysis, longitudinal SEM in a single-level, wide format is formulated in a new way that finds a well-fitting model 45 years after the writing of the classic Wheaton, Muthen, Alwin, and Summers article. This segues into a generalization of latent transition analysis using the multilevel notion of a random intercept while staying in a single-level, wide format. Turning back to multilevel modeling, the talk considers time series analysis of intensive longitudinal data. This is illustrated by intervention data on electricity consumption and a randomized intervention related to positive and negative affect where cycles play a major role. Finally, the new feature in Mplus Version 8.5 of Bayesian analysis of count, nominal, and binary logit models is presented.

This session is jointly sponsored by the Statistics department and the Research Methods, Measurement, and Evaluation program as part of the Statistical Applications and Quantitative Research Methods colloquium series.

Paul De Boeck , The Ohio State University

Friday, December 18, 2020 12:00 EST

Response Accuracy and Response Time in Cognitive Tests

It is an old and still unresolved issue how much a cognitive test score reflects ability and how much it reflects speed. The well-known speed-accuracy tradeoff does not make an answer to the question easier. In the presentation I will report the results of my research steps to investigate the problem. Briefly summarized, the findings are as follows. First, the correlation of ability and speed across persons depends on the test. Second, based on different kinds of modeling and different kinds of data, there seem to be remaining item-wise dependencies (i.e., conditional dependencies) between response accuracy and response time after controlling for the underlying latent variables. Third, the remaining dependencies depend on the difficulties of the test items and the dependencies also are curvilinear. I will present an explanation for the findings, and a tentative, complex answer to the old question what is being measured in a cognitive test.
This session is jointly sponsored by the Statistics department and the Research Methods, Measurement, and Evaluation program, University of Connecticut (UCONN), New England Statistical Society (NESS) and Statistical and Applied Mathematical Institute (SAMSI) as part of online interdisciplinary seminar series on statistical methodology for social and behavioral research.